4: Adler and Rodrieguez

Upon finishing these readings, I’m not exactly sure how to feel. I just kind of feel a little lost now upon making my new post and noticing that there is no spot to categorize our fourth blog post – oh no! What to do!

But! Thankfully, I did kind of enjoy reading Adler and Rodriguez’s essays.

At one point in Adler’s essay, responding to his sentence, “the physical act of writing, with your own hand, brings words and sentences more sharply before your mind and preserves them better in your memory.” (Adler, 48) I wrote “great reason why one should take notes!”. I wrote this because while reading I found myself searching the article for what I thought would be a valid point as to why one should take notes in the margins of a book. I have always been the type of person who likes to keep my books in pristine condition, so I would need a really good reason to write in them… otherwise I feel as if I am trespassing or something. I think if I knew that I would learn more, and better retain what I was reading about, then I would more frequently take notes! I think knowing now that taking notes while reading will enhance my memory, that I will take more notes so that I can actively engage with the text!

As for Rodriguez’s essay, I felt like I was more so reading a story, instead of necessarily finding phrases that I could connect to or learn from. One particular sentence that did stick out to me though is when he writes, “I looked at every word of the text.” (Rodriguez, 265). At this point I commented, “If I did that, maybe I would have a greater appreciation for everything that I read.” I feel as if a lot of time I skip over words, and find myself looking backwards to the text, searching for the one word that would have everything make sense. I wrote this comment to make myself more aware of the benefits of actually taking the time to read everything in a piece of literature. Maybe if I really engage myself in what I’m reading, by reading every word and taking notes, I would end up learning more and remembering more!

As for a connection between these two authors, there was actually a different quote from Rodriguez that I found which contradicts the idea in Adler’s paper. Both authors talk about reading and feeling more connected to reading, although in Rodriguez’s essay there is nothing mentioned about writing notes to connect with the text. In Adler’s essay he writes “If your respect for magnificent binding or typography gets in the way, buy yourself a cheap edition and pay your respects to the author” (Adler, 47). At this quote I wrote that I disagreed, because I have always been taught that to respect a piece of literature is to keep it pretty, the way it came. Rodriguez mentions this idea too in his paper, as he quotes his teacher saying, “Boys and girls, don’t write in your books. You must learn to treat them with great care and respect.” (Rodriguez, 21). This idea contradicts Adler’s idea that to respect a book is to write in it, because when you write a book you are analyzing the author’s ideas and having a “conversation” with the author, which is a sign of respect (Adler, 18). Rodriguez greatly respected books, as they opened him up to new ideas about the World, although he never mentions writing in his books to respect them. I think it’s interesting that two people can connect to books in similar ways, but through different mechanisms.

Woah! This picture is really blurry - sorry about that! Reading about how to read was obviously really exciting me though, I even stopped to mention that instead of throwing away their notes, paper should be recycled! I think taking notes made me more aware of the text.
Woah! This picture is really blurry – sorry about that! Reading about how to read was obviously really exciting me though, I even stopped to mention that instead of throwing away their notes, paper should be recycled! I think taking notes made me more aware of the text.

**New update – I found the category for this blog post – no worries!

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This is a place for me to keep all of my work from my Writing 100 class that I took with Professor Jennifer Metsker.

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